Study Shows One in Three Australians are Socially Jet-lagged

Source: Pixabay.com

A new study has revealed that Australians have pretty bad sleeping habits and a lot of it has to do with our phones or more specifically social media.

The study, recently published in the Sleep Medicine journal revealed that 31 per cent of participants had their body clock disrupted on weekends compared to work nights.

Professor Robert Adams, the study’s lead researcher and sleep specialist with the University of Adelaide and the Sleep Health Foundation said a lot of people’s body clocks are out of alignment and as we know this negatively impacts  their health and well-being. 

The professor said the findings show the need for a national inquiry to relieve our sleep loss epidemic.

In the past research suggested that using technology before bed can shorten sleep and increase tiredness.

Source: https://www.menshealth.com.au/one-third-of-australians-sleep-not-lining-up-with-social-commitments

Contractor Fined for Death of Fatigued Worker

Worker fatigue is not to be taken lightly, as an incident in New Zealand has recently proven.

WorkSafe New Zealand warned that work fatigue should not compromise worker safety, sharing the details of an incident which led to a company being sentenced for the death of a fatigued worker in 2016.

A worker had logged a 16,75 hour day when he crashed the tractor he was driving and died as a result of injuries.

An investigation found that the man had workers 197.25 hours in the two weeks leading up to the incident and fatigue was identified as the most likely cause of the incident. He had not been wearing a seatbelt at the time.

The company received a final fine of $10,000 and ordered to pay reparation of $80,000.

The Fortnightly OH&S News Wrap-Up: Learn to Manage Fatigue

Fatigue is a risk to workers which can be overcome with a little effort and in the construction industry it’s an issue that is of particular importance because workers engage in dangerous activities that can threaten their safety or the safety of those around them.

Read the full article here: Learning to Manage Fatigue in the Building Industry

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Learning to Manage Fatigue in the Building Industry

Source : Pedro Ribeiro Simões

Fatigue is a risk to workers which can be overcome with a little effort and in the construction industry it is an issue that is of particular importance because workers engage in dangerous activities that can threaten their safety or the safety of those around them.

The main causes of fatigue in construction workers are working night shifts or long hours, broken shifts, lack of sleep or any disruption in the sleep cycle pattern, bad quality sleep, emotional or lifestyle issues.

Some of the methods suggested by authorities to manage fatigue include:

  • Limiting over time work
  • Drawing up rosters to allow workers to sleep for a continuous 8 hour period every 24 hour cycle.
  • Make sure workers take regular breaks and rest
  • Make sure that there is enough staff at any one time to meet the demands of the workplace, do not overload a few workers with the entire sites work.
  • Minimise work that starts prior to 6am
  • Ensure that workers are given sufficient time between shifts. Adults require approximately seven to eight continuous hours of daily sleep. One way of doing this would be giving workers two successive full days off within a seven day period, so workers can catch up on their night sleep.