Why Workers Stay Off Work So Much

According to a new report, as many as one in five Australians have stayed away from work in the past 12 months due to stress, depression or mental illness.

A report by BeyondBlue called the State of Workplace Health in Australia, found there was a disconnect between management and the workforce on the treatment of mental wellbeing and how it was being promoted in the organisation.

The report questioned more than 1000 participants across Australia and found that a staggering 71 per cent of leaders believed they were committed to promoting staff mental health and only 37 per cent of employees agreed with this.

The biggest culprits were long working hours and an inadequate work/life balance.

Although mental health is not an issue often discussed in the construction industry, this report proves the importance of making it a priority.

Read more at https://probonoaustralia.com.au/news/2017/05/work-stress-leading-cause-absenteeism-workcover-claims/

 

Hundreds of Workers Have Illegally Obtained Construction Induction Cards

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Police are concerned that hundreds of people could be working illegally on building sites, after it was discovered that a Sydney man was paid to sit for tests for certificates to fraudulently obtain construction induction cards for workers with limited English speaking abilities.

Presumably the workers could not pass the White Card course themselves because of the language barrier, which is why Kelvin Fong did it for them.

Construction induction training also known as white card training is mandatory for all construction workers, throughout Australia.

The 37 year old man was jailed for at least 6 months after he procured as many as 400 construction induction cards for unqualified workers. The magistrate described the offence as “breathtakingly serious” which is understandable given that he was putting not only the workers themselves at risk but every single person on the site with them, as well as the public.

No need to obtain your White Card fraudulently when the course is affordable and simple to pass, given you are proficient in English and can complete a short online and telephone based verbal assessment. As a reputable and industry leading Registered Training Organisation, having issued hundreds of thousands of White Cards, we also have recognition software to avoid incidents of fraud.

Read more at http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/news/nsw/dodgy-construction-induction-cards-used-for-hundreds-working-illegally-on-building-sites-police-fear/news-story/de29334b86e6d445009dafa13ad1572f

Best Paying Jobs and Industries in Australia Revealed

SEEK used job advertisements to determine the best-paying jobs and industries in Australia and the construction industry has made the top 5 list.

All of the industries on the top 5 list pay an average annual salary over $100,000.

The highest paying industry is the Mining, Resources and Energy industry with an average salary of $115.005 per annum.

The Construction industry is number 3 on the list, with an average salary of $106,693.

Also making the list is Consulting and Strategy, Engineering and Information and Communication Technology.

Read more at https://www.businessinsider.com.au/the-best-paying-jobs-and-industries-in-australia-2017-2

Which Industry Pays the Most in Australia?

SEEK, the job website has revealed the highest paying industries in Australia on average, with all of the top 5 industries paying above $100,000 per annum.

These are the top 5 highest paying industries according to job advertisements placed on SEEK.

  1. Mining, Resources and Energy
  2. Consulting and Strategy
  3. Construction
  4. Engineering
  5. Information and Communication Technology

As one of the top 5 industries, construction can be extremely rewarding. If you’re interested in joining this industry, you will need to get a White Card, this is a mandatory safety requirement.

Find out more about Australian wages at https://www.businessinsider.com.au/the-best-paying-jobs-and-industries-in-australia-2017-2