How Technology Will Change Construction in 2017

What technological developments can we expect to see within the construction industries in 2017?

Well according to a post on Spatialsource.com.au we can expect an uptake in construction spending across Australia which will impact the technology we see. We can expect innovative solutions and methodologies across a number of areas in this sector.

We can expect,

  1. significant advancement of BIM (Building Information Management) and adoption of model-based construction.
  2. Cloud-based design, driven by globalisation.
  3. Growing adoption of the connected site where equipment is connected.
  4. WIFI site-wide to increase connectivity.
  5. Continued advancements in positioning.

Find out more http://www.spatialsource.com.au/company-industry/5-ways-technology-will-modernise-construction-2017

Japan Developing Construction Machines to Build in Space

moon surface

The Japanese are always inventing something and this time their creation is meant to help with building habitats for humans on Mars and the moon.

According to reports The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency together with construction company Kajima is developing an autonomous construction system which will allow humans to deliver instructions to machinery to carry out the work on Mars or the moon.

The machinery will be equipped with GPS and accelerometers using tablet computers.

The machinery will also be able to communicate with each other, so they don’t get in each other’s way and hamper construction.

The Japanese hope to have the machinery ready to construct habitats for 4 to 6 people on the moon by 2030 and Mars by 2040.

Source: http://www.cnet.com/au/news/japan-developing-extraterrestrial-construction-machines/

Construction Technology Summit Planned for This Week

Into the Future
Into the Future

The First Digital Industry Event will be taking place in Melbourne this week and will connect construction leaders and technology innovators.

The event was organised by Aconex Limited (ASX:ACX) and is the first of its kind.

The summit is taking place on 16 and 17th June and will connect the country’s leading contractors, developers and consultants with digital construction technology innovators.

According to the press release, the event will provide an opportunity to explore a range of emerging digital technologies and how they will transform the construction industry.

Find out more at https://www.newsmaker.com.au/news/57969/construction-technology-summit-2016-scheduled-for-1617-june#.V1726Lt97IV

Robots to Change Building Industry Forever

BIG-Google-Campus-robots-construction_dezeen_936_2
Google’s new campus. Source: Dezeen.com

 

According to BIG partner Kai-Uwe Bergmann, robots will completely change the face of the building industry over the next 50 years. He was speaking at the World Architecture Festival in Singapore recently when he spoke about how robotics would influence the future of the industry.

He explained that some of the more high risk work involved with construction could be taken over by robots so that the risk to humans would be eliminated.

In fact the company who are working on the new Google campus in Mountain View California will be making use of robots.

Read more at http://www.dezeen.com/2015/11/10/robotics-revolutionise-building-industry-50-years-big-kai-uwe-bergmann/

 

Construction Technology Update: Pollution Extracting Bricks

vacum-brick
Source: Sourceable.net.au

Technology in construction is advancing at such a fast pace that we can barely keep up. The latest development is a brick that could alleviate a huge problem in every city around the world. The problem – pollution, the solution – pollution extracting bricks.

In a recent post on Sourceable.net the transition by designers from simply reducing buildings’ emissions to working with techniques that remove pollutants from the air was discussed. One such system is Nemesi’s “photcatalytic’ facade for the Italy Pavilion at the 2015 Milan Expo.

The facade captures and reacts with pollution in the presence of light. These technologies mostly affect the air that physically comes into contact with them by working like a vacuum cleaner, sucking in the air and cleansing it.

For a more indepth explanation visit Sourceable.net

New Construction Technologies Both a Blessing and a Curse

enr06292015Tech_SAM
Source: enr.construction.com

While it’s easy to become fascinated by the new technologies in the construction industry with something new and amazing hitting the market almost every day, the CEDA recently stated in a report  that due to these advancements approximately 40 per cent of the country’s construction workforce would probably be made redundant in about 10 to 15 years.

An article on Sourceable.net recently discussed this move of the construction industry towards a more machine-dominated sector and the risks this poses to people and their livelihoods.

Read more about some of the new technologies being introduced and the implications for the industry here.

Wearable Technology the Latest Workplace Trend

wear tech
Source: Smh.com.au

Workers in Sweden are opting for a system that involves implantation of chip into their skin. The NFC (near-field communication) chip allows workers to swipe into the office, set the alarm system, register loyalty points at nearby retailers and enter the gym. The system eliminates the need for key-fobs or electronic entry cards.

These technologies are also being used to track employee health and safety on high risk work sites such as remote construction sites. Would you allow your employer to insert a microchip into your skin?

Find out more here.

Sculpt Wood and Stone by Hand with New Glove

Happaratus-power-glove-Morten-Groenning_dezeen_14_644
Source: Dezeen.com

Improve speed and efficiency of carving stone and wood with a new development called the Happaratus glove.

A Royal College of Art graduate Morten Grønning recently adapted an electric kitchen knife to make a prototype glove for carving hard materials such as wood and stone.

Abrasive pads on the glove’s fingertips move back and forth in a reciprocating motion, enabling the wearer to sculpt materials.

Click here for more information.